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A Splendid Exchange - William J. Bernstein
Call Number: HF 1379 .B476 2008
ISBN: 9780802144164
Publication Date: 2009
Acclaimed by readers and critics around the globe, A Splendid Exchange is a sweeping narrative history of world trade#151;from Mesopotamia in 3000 B.C. to the firestorm over globalization today#151;that brilliantly explores trade’s colorful and contentious past and provides new insights into its future.

American Company: The Tragedy of United Fruit - McCann, Thomas P.
Call Number: HD 9249 .U6 M23 1976
ISBN: 0517528096
Publication Date: 1988

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The Corporation That Changed the World: How the East India Company Shaped the Modern Multinational - Robins, Nick
ISBN: 9780745325231
Publication Date: 2006
This is a popular history of one of the world's most famous companies. Founded in 1600, the East India Company was the forerunner of the modern multinational. Starting life as a trader in Asian spices, the Company ended its days running Britain's Indian empire. In the process, it shocked its contemporaries with the scale of its violence, corruption and speculation.This is the first-ever book to expose the Company's social record. Robins reveals a hidden story of tragedy and intrigue. War, famine, stock-market bubbles and even duels between rival executives are all to be found in this new account. For Robins, the Company's legacy provides compelling lessons on how to ensure the accountability of today's global business.

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America's Food - Harvey Blatt
Call Number: HD 9005 .B628 2008
ISBN: 026202652X
Publication Date: 2008-08-22
We don't think much about how food gets to our tables, or what had to happen to fillour supermarket's produce section with perfectly round red tomatoes and its meat counter with slabsof beautifully marbled steak. We don't realize that the meat in one fast-food hamburger may comefrom a thousand different cattle raised in five different countries. In fact, most of us have afairly abstract understanding of what happens on a farm. In America's Food, Harvey Blatt gives usthe specifics. He tells us, for example, that a third of the fruits and vegetables grown arediscarded for purely aesthetic reasons; that the artificial fertilizers used to enrich our depletedsoil contain poisonous heavy metals; that chickens who stand all day on wire in cages choose feedwith pain-killing drugs over feed without them; and that the average American eats his or her bodyweight in food additives each year. Blatt also asks us to think about the consequences of eatingfood so far removed from agriculture; why unhealthy food is cheap; why there is an InternationalFederation of Competitive Eating; what we don't want to know about how animals raised for meat live,die, and are butchered; whether people are even designed to be carnivorous; and why there is hungerwhen food production has increased so dramatically. America's Food describes the production of alltypes of food in the United States and the environmental and health problems associated with each.After taking us on a tour of the American food system---not only the basic food groups but soil,grain farming, organic food, genetically modified food, food processing, and diet--Blatt reminds usthat we aren't powerless. Once we know the facts about food in America, we can change things by thechoices we make as consumers, as voters, and as ethical human beings

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Appetite for Profit: How the Food Industry Undermines Our Health and How to Fight Back - Simon, Michele R.
Call Number: TX 360 .U6 S56 2006
ISBN: 1560259329
Publication Date: 2006
The United States is currently embroiled in a national debate over the growing public health crisis caused by poor diet. People are starting to ask who is to blame and how can we fix the problem, especially among children. Major food companies are responding with a massive public relations campaign. These companies, including McDonald's, Coca-Cola, Kraft, and General Mills, are increasingly on the defensive. In response, they pretend to sell healthier food and otherwise position themselvesas "part of the solution." Yet they continue to lobby against commonsense nutrition policies. Appetite for Profit exposes this hypocrisy and explains how to fight back by offering reliable resources. Readers will learn how to spot the PR and how to organize to improve food in schools and elsewhere. For the first time, author Michele Simon explains why we cannot trust food corporations to "do the right thing." She describes the local battles of going up against the powerful food lobbies and offers a comprehensive guide to the public relations, front groups, and lobbying tactics that food companies employ to trick the American public. Simon also provides an entertaining glossary that explains corporate rhetoric, including phrases like "better-for-you foods" and "frivolous lawsuit."

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Bananas: An American History - Jenkins, Virginia Scott
Call Number: HD 9259 .B3 U537 2000
ISBN: 1560989661
Publication Date: 2000
Before 1880 most Americans had never seen a banana. By 1910 bananas were so common that streets were littered with their peels. Today Americans eat on average nearly seventy-five per year. More than a staple of the American diet, bananas have gained a secure place in the nation's culture and folklore. They have been recommended as the secret to longevity, the perfect food for infants, and the cure for warts, headaches, and stage fright. Essential to the cereal bowl and the pratfall, they remain a mainstay of jokes, songs, and wordplay even after a century of rapid change. Covering every aspect of the banana in American culture, from its beginnings as luxury food to its reputation in the 1910s as the "poor man's" fruit to its role today as a healthy, easy-to-carry snack, Bananas provides an insightful look at a fruit with appeal.

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Berenike and the Ancient Maritime Spice Route - Sidebotham, Steven E.
ISBN: 0520244303
Publication Date: 2011
The legendary overland silk road was not the only way to reach Asia for ancient travelers from the Mediterranean. During the Roman Empire's heyday, equally important maritime routes reached from the Egyptian Red Sea across the Indian Ocean. The ancient city of Berenike, located approximately 500 miles south of today's Suez Canal, was a significant port among these conduits. In this book, Steven E. Sidebotham, the archaeologist who excavated Berenike, uncovers the role the city played in the regional, local, and "global" economies during the eight centuries of its existence. Sidebotham analyzes many of the artifacts, botanical and faunal remains, and hundreds of the texts he and his team found in excavations, providing a profoundly intimate glimpse of the people who lived, worked, and died in this emporium between the classical Mediterranean world and Asia.

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Bitter Chocolate: Investigating the Dark Side of the World's Most Seductive Sweet - Off, Carol
Call Number: HD 9200 .A2 O34 2008
ISBN: 0679313192
Publication Date: 2006

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The Broken Village: Coffee, Migration, and Globalizaton in Honduras - Reichman, Daniel R.
ISBN: 0801477298
Publication Date: 2011
In The Broken Village, Daniel R. Reichman tells the story of a remote village in Honduras that transformed almost overnight from a sleepy coffee-growing community to a hotbed of undocumented migration to and from the United States. The small village-called here by the pseudonym La Quebrada-was once home to a thriving coffee economy. Recently, it has become dependent on migrants working in distant places like Long Island and South Dakota, who live in ways that most Honduran townspeople struggle to comprehend or explain. Reichman explores how the new "migration economy" has upended cultural ideas of success and failure, family dynamics, and local politics. During his time in La Quebrada, Reichman focused on three different strategies for social reform-a fledgling coffee cooperative that sought to raise farmer incomes and establish principles of fairness and justice through consumer activism; religious campaigns for personal morality that were intended to counter the corrosive effects of migration; and local discourses about migrant "greed" that labeled migrants as the cause of social crisis, rather than its victims. All three phenomena had one common trait: They were settings in which people presented moral visions of social welfare in response to a perceived moment of crisis. The Broken Village integrates sacred and secular ideas of morality, legal and cultural notions of justice, to explore how different groups define social progress.
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Building a Housewife's Paradise: Gender, Politics, and American Grocery Stores in the Twentieth Century - Deutsch, Tracey
ISBN: 0807833274
Publication Date: 2010
Supermarkets are a mundane feature in the landscape, but as Tracey Deutsch reveals, they represent a major transformation in the ways that Americans feed themselves. In her examination of the history of food distribution in the United States, Deutsch demonstrates the important roles that gender, business, class, and the state played in the evolution of American grocery stores. Deutsch's analysis reframes shopping as labor and embeds consumption in the structures of capitalism. The supermarket, that icon of postwar American life, emerged not from straightforward consumer demand for low prices, Deutsch argues, but through government regulations, women customers' demands, and retailers' concerns with financial success and control of the "shop floor." From small neighborhood stores to huge corporate chains of supermarkets, Deutsch traces the charged story of the origins of contemporary food distribution, treating topics as varied as everyday food purchases, the sales tax, postwar celebrations and critiques of mass consumption, and 1960s and 1970s urban insurrections. Demonstrating connections between women's work and the history of capitalism, Deutsch locates the origins of supermarkets in the politics of twentieth-century consumption.
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Business of Empire: United Fruit, Race and the U.S. Expansion in Central America - Colby, Jason M.
ISBN: 9780801462719
Publication Date: 2011
The link between private corporations and U.S. world power has a much longer history than most people realize. Transnational firms such as the United Fruit Company represent an earlier stage of the economic and cultural globalization now taking place throughout the world. Drawing on a wide range of archival sources in the United States, Great Britain, Costa Rica, and Guatemala, Colby combines "top-down" and "bottom-up" approaches to provide new insight into the role of transnational capital, labor migration, and racial nationalism in shaping U.S. expansion into Central America and the greater Caribbean. The Business of Empire places corporate power and local context at the heart of U.S. imperial history. In the early twentieth century, U.S. influence in Central America came primarily in the form of private enterprise, above all United Fruit. Founded amid the U.S. leap into overseas empire, the company initially depended upon British West Indian laborers. When its black workforce resisted white American authority, the firm adopted a strategy of labor division by recruiting Hispanic migrants. This labor system drew the company into increased conflict with its host nations, as Central American nationalists denounced not only U.S. military interventions in the region but also American employment of black immigrants. By the 1930s, just as Washington renounced military intervention in Latin America, United Fruit pursued its own Good Neighbor Policy, which brought a reduction in its corporate colonial power and a ban on the hiring of black immigrants. The end of the company's system of labor division in turn pointed the way to the transformation of United Fruit as well as the broader U.S. empire.

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Carrot City: Creating Places for Urban Agriculture - June Komisar; Joe Nasr; Mark Gorgolewski
Call Number: NA 9060 .G667 2011
ISBN: 1580933114
Publication Date: 2011
Carrot City is a collection of ideas, both conceptual and realized, that use design to enable sustainable food production, helping to reintroduce urban agriculture to our cities. Focusing on the need and desire to grow food within the city to supply food from local sources, the contributions of architecture, landscape design, and urban design are explored. Forty projects demonstrate how the production of food can lead to visually striking and artistically interesting solutions that create community and provide inhabitants with immediate access to fresh, healthful ingredients. The authors show how city planning and architecture that considers food production as a fundamental requirement of design result in more community gardens, greenhouses tucked under raised highways, edible landscapes in front yards in place of resource-devouring lawns, living walls that bring greenery into dense city blocks, and productive green roofs on schools and large apartment blocks that can be tended and harvested by students and residents alike.

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Chicken: The Dangerous Transformation of America's Favorite Food - Striffler, Steve
Call Number: HD 9437 .U62 S77 2005
ISBN: 0300095295
Publication Date: 2005
Anthropologist Steve Striffler begins this book in a poultry processing plant, drawing on his own experiences there as a worker. He also reports on the way chickens are raised today and how they are consumed. What he discovers about America’s favorite meat is not just unpleasant but a powerful indictment of our industrial food system. The process of bringing chicken to our dinner tables is unhealthy for all concerned#151;from farmer to factory worker to consumer.The book traces the development of the poultry industry since the Second World War, analyzing the impact of such changes as the destruction of the family farm, the processing of chicken into nuggets and patties, and the changing makeup of the industrial labor force. The author describes the lives of immigrant workers and their reception in the small towns where they live. The conclusion is clear: there has to be a better way. Striffler proposes radical but practical change, a plan that promises more humane treatment of chickens, better food for the consumer, and fair payment for food workers and farmers.

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Chocolate on Trial: Slavery, Politics, and the Ethics of Business - Satre, Lowell J.
Call Number: HD 9200 .G72 S38 2005
ISBN: 0821416251
Publication Date: 2005
Chocolate on Trial: Cadbury, Slavery and the Economics of Virtue in Imperial Britain gives a lively and highly readable account of the events surrounding the libel trial in which Cadbury Bros. Ltd. sued the London Standard, following the newspaper's accusation that the firm was hypocritical in its use of slave-grown cocoa. As compelling now as at the turn of the previous century, the issues probed by Lowell J. Satre give invaluable historical background to contemporary issues of business ethics, corporate social responsibility, and globalization. The story Satre tells illuminates what a stubbornly persistent institution slavery was and shows how Cadbury, a company with a well-regarded brand name and logo, endured ethical dilemmas and challenges to its record for social responsibility. Chocolate on Trial brings to life the age-old conflict between economic interests and the value of human life.

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Coffee and Community: Maya Farmers and Fair-Trade Markets - Lyon, Sarah
ISBN: 9781607320586
Publication Date: 2010
We are told that simply by sipping our morning cup of organic, fair-trade coffee we are encouraging environmentally friendly agricultural methods, community development, fair prices, and shortened commodity chains. But what is the reality for producers, intermediaries, and consumers? This ethnographic analysis of fair-trade coffee analyzes the collective action and combined efforts of fair-trade network participants to construct a new economic reality. Focusing on La Voz Que Clama en el Desierto-a cooperative in San Juan la Laguna, Guatemala-and its relationships with coffee roasters, importers, and certifiers in the United States, Coffee and Community argues that while fair trade does benefit small coffee-farming communities, it is more flawed than advocates and scholars have acknowledged. However, through detailed ethnographic fieldwork with the farmers and by following the product, fair trade can be understood and modified to be more equitable. This book will be of interest to students and academics in anthropology, ethnology, Latin American studies, and labor studies, as well as economists, social scientists, policy makers, fair-trade advocates, and anyone interested in globalization and the realities of fair trade. Winner of the Society for Economic Anthropology Book Award
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The Company They Kept: Migrants and the Politics of Gender in the Caribbean Costa Rica, 1870-1960 - Putnam, Lara
ISBN: 9780807862230
Publication Date: 2003
In the late nineteenth century, migrants from Jamaica, Colombia, Barbados, and beyond poured into Caribbean Central America, building railroads, digging canals, selling meals, and farming homesteads. On the rain-forested shores of Costa Rica, U.S. entrepreneurs and others established vast banana plantations. Over the next half-century, short-lived export booms drew tens of thousands of migrants to the region. In Port Limon, birthplace of the United Fruit Company, a single building might house a Russian seamstress, a Martinican madam, a Cuban doctor, and a Chinese barkeep--together with stevedores, laundresses, and laborers from across the Caribbean. Tracing the changing contours of gender, kinship, and community in Costa Rica's plantation region, Lara Putnam explores new questions about the work of caring for children and men and how it fit into the export economy, the role of kinship as well as cash in structuring labor, the social networks that shaped migrants' lives, and the impact of ideas about race and sex on the exercise of power. Based on sources that range from handwritten autobiographies to judicial transcripts and addressing topics from intimacy between prostitutes to insults between neighbors, the book illuminates the connections between political economy, popular culture, and everyday life.

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Confronting the Coffee Crisis - Christopher M. Bacon; Stephen R. Gliessman; V. Ernesto Mendez; David Goodman; Jonathan A. Fox, eds.
Call Number: HD 9199 .M62 C66 2008
ISBN: 0262524805
Publication Date: 2008
Our morning cups of coffee connect us to a global industry and an export crisis in the tropics that is destroying livelihoods, undermining the cohesion of families and communities, and threatening ecosystems. Confronting the Coffee Crisis explores small-scale farming, the political economy of the global coffee industry, and initiatives that claim to promote more sustainable rural development in coffee-producing communities. Contributors review the historical, political, economic, and agroecological processes within today's coffee industry and analyze the severely depressed export market that faces small-scale growers in Mexico and Central America. The book presents a series of interdisciplinary, empirically rich case studies showing how small-scale farmers manage ecosystems and organize collectively as they seek useful collaborations with international NGOs and coffee companies to create opportunities for themselves in the coffee market. The findings demonstrate the interconnections among farmer livelihoods, biodiversity, conservation, and changing coffee markets. Additional chapters examine alternative trade practices, certification, and eco-labeling, discussing the politics and market growth of organic, shade-grown, and Fair Trade coffees. Combining interdisciplinary research with case-study analysis at scales ranging from the local to the global, Confronting the Coffee Crisis reveals the promise and the perils of efforts to create a more sustainable coffee industry. Christopher M. Bacon is a researcher associated with the Environmental Studies and Sociology Departments at the University of California, Santa Cruz. V. Ernesto Méndez is Assistant Professor in the Environmental Program and Department of Plant and Soil Science at the University of Vermont. Stephen R. Gliessman is Alfred Heller Professor of Agroecology at the University of California, Santa Cruz, where David Goodman is Professor of Environmental Studies and Jonathan A. Fox is Professor in the Latin American and Latino Studies Department. ContributorsChristopher M. Bacon, David B. Bray, Sasha Courville, Jonathan A. Fox, Stephen R. Gliessman, David Goodman, Carlos Guadarrama-Zugasti, Shayna Harris, Roberta Jaffe, María Elena Martinez-Torres, V. Ernesto Méndez, Ellen Contreras Murphy, Tad Mutersbaugh, Seth Petchers, José Luis Plaza-Sanchez, Laura Trujillo, Silke Mason Westphal

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Confronting the Coffee Crisis - Christopher M. Bacon (Editor); Stephen R. Gliessman (Editor); V. Ernesto Mendez (Editor); David Goodman (Editor); Jonathan A. Fox (Editor)
ISBN: 0262524805
Publication Date: 2008-01-18
Our morning cups of coffee connect us to a global industry and an export crisis in the tropics that is destroying livelihoods, undermining the cohesion of families and communities, and threatening ecosystems. Confronting the Coffee Crisis explores small-scale farming, the political economy of the global coffee industry, and initiatives that claim to promote more sustainable rural development in coffee-producing communities. Contributors review the historical, political, economic, and agroecological processes within today's coffee industry and analyze the severely depressed export market that faces small-scale growers in Mexico and Central America. The book presents a series of interdisciplinary, empirically rich case studies showing how small-scale farmers manage ecosystems and organize collectively as they seek useful collaborations with international NGOs and coffee companies to create opportunities for themselves in the coffee market. The findings demonstrate the interconnections among farmer livelihoods, biodiversity, conservation, and changing coffee markets. Additional chapters examine alternative trade practices, certification, and eco-labeling, discussing the politics and market growth of organic, shade-grown, and Fair Trade coffees. Combining interdisciplinary research with case-study analysis at scales ranging from the local to the global, Confronting the Coffee Crisis reveals the promise and the perils of efforts to create a more sustainable coffee industry. Christopher M. Bacon is a researcher associated with the Environmental Studies and Sociology Departments at the University of California, Santa Cruz. V. Ernesto Méndez is Assistant Professor in the Environmental Program and Department of Plant and Soil Science at the University of Vermont. Stephen R. Gliessman is Alfred Heller Professor of Agroecology at the University of California, Santa Cruz, where David Goodman is Professor of Environmental Studies and Jonathan A. Fox is Professor in the Latin American and Latino Studies Department. ContributorsChristopher M. Bacon, David B. Bray, Sasha Courville, Jonathan A. Fox, Stephen R. Gliessman, David Goodman, Carlos Guadarrama-Zugasti, Shayna Harris, Roberta Jaffe, María Elena Martinez-Torres, V. Ernesto Méndez, Ellen Contreras Murphy, Tad Mutersbaugh, Seth Petchers, José Luis Plaza-Sanchez, Laura Trujillo, Silke Mason Westphal
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Consumed: Food for a Finite Planet - Elton, Sarah
Call Number: S 494.5 .S86 E467 2013
ISBN: 022609362X
Publication Date: 2013
By 2050, the world population is expected to reach nine billion. And the challenge of feeding this rapidly growing population is being made greater by climate change, which will increasingly wreak havoc on the way we produce our food. At the same time, we have lost touch with the soil--few of us know where our food comes from, let alone how to grow it--and we are at the mercy of multinational corporations who control the crops and give little thought to the damage their methods are inflicting on the planet. Our very future is at risk.             In Consumed, Sarah Elton walks fields and farms on three continents, not only investigating the very real threats to our food, but also telling the little-known stories of the people who are working against time to create a new and hopeful future. From the mountains of southern France to the highlands of China, from the crowded streets of Nairobi to the banks of the St. Lawrence River in Quebec, we meet people from all walks of life who are putting together an alternative to the omnipresent industrial food system. In the arid fields of rural India we meet a farmer who has transformed her community by selling organic food directly to her neighbors. We visit a laboratory in Toronto where scientists are breeding a new kind of rice seed that they claim will feed the world. We learn about Italy's underground food movement; how university grads are returning to the fields in China, Greece, and France; and how in Detroit, plots of vacant land planted with kale and carrots can help us see what's possible.             Food might be the problem, but as Elton shows, it is also the solution. The food system as we know it was assembled in a few decades--and if it can be built that quickly, it can be reassembled and improved in the same amount of time. Elton here lays out the targets we need to meet by the year 2050. The stories she tells give us hope for avoiding a daunting fate and instead help us to believe in a not-too-distant future when we can all sit at the table.

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The Consuming Instinct: What Juicy Burgers, Ferraris, Prnography, and Gift Giving Reveal About Human Nature - Saad, Gad
Call Number: HF 5415.32 .S18 2011
ISBN: 1616144297
Publication Date: 2011
In this highly informative and entertaining book, the founder of the vibrant new field of evolutionary consumption illuminates the relevance of our biological heritage to our daily lives as consumers. While culture is important, the author shows that innate evolutionary forces deeply influence the foods we eat, the gifts we offer, the cosmetics and clothing styles we choose to make ourselves more attractive to potential mates, and even the cultural products that stimulate our imaginations (such as art, music, and religion). The book demonstrates that most acts of consumption can be mapped onto four key Darwinian drives--namely, survival (we prefer foods high in calories); reproduction (we use products as sexual signals); kin selection (we naturally exchange gifts with family members); and reciprocal altruism (we enjoy offering gifts to close friends). The author further highlights the analogous behaviors that exist between human consumers and a wide range of animals. For anyone interested in the biological basis of human behavior or simply in what makes consumers tick--marketing professionals, advertisers, psychology mavens, and consumers themselves--this is a fascinating read.

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The Corporation That Changed the World: How the East India Company Shaped the Modern Multinational - Robins, Nick
ISBN: 0745331955
Publication Date: 2012
The English East India Company was the mother of the modern multinational. Its trading empire encircled the globe, importing Asian luxuries such as spices, textiles and teas. But it also conquered much of India with its private army and broke open China's markets with opium. The Company's practices shocked its contemporaries and still reverberate today.The Corporation That Changed the World is the first book to reveal the Company's enduring legacy as a corporation. This expanded edition explores how the four forces of scale, technology, finance and regulation drove its spectacular rise and fall. For decades, the Company was simply too big to fail, and stock market bubbles, famines, drug-running and even duels between rival executives are to be found in this new account.For Robins, the Company's story provides vital lessons on both the role of corporations in world history and the steps required to make global business accountable today.
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Crunch!: A History of the Great American Potato Chip - Burhans, Dirk E.
Call Number: HD 9235 .P82 U434 2008
ISBN: 0299227707
Publication Date: 2008
The potato chip has been one of America's favorite snacks since its accidental origin in a nineteenth-century kitchen. Crunch! A History of the Great American Potato Chip tells the story of this crispy, salty treat, from the early sales of locally made chips at corner groceries, county fairs, and cafes to the mass marketing and corporate consolidation of the modern snack food industry.     Crunch! also uncovers a dark side of potato chip history, including a federal investigation of the snack food industry in the 1990s following widespread allegations of antitrust activity, illegal buyouts, and predatory pricing. In the wake of these "Great Potato Chip Wars," corporate snack divisions closed and dozens of family-owned companies went bankrupt. Yet, despite consolidation, many small chippers persist into the twenty-first century, as mom-and-pop companies and upstart "boutique" businesses serve both new consumers and markets with strong regional loyalties.     Illustrated with images of early snack food paraphernalia and clever packaging from the glory days of American advertising art, Crunch! is an informative tour of large and small business in America and the vicissitudes of popular tastes. Best Books for General Audiences, selected by the American Association of School Librarians, and Outstanding Book, selected by the Public Library Association

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Diet for a Dead Planet: How the Food Industry is Killing Us - Cook, Christopher D.
Call Number: HD 9000.9 .A1 C65 2004
ISBN: 1565848640
Publication Date: 2004
This absorbing study looks at the dangers of American food production, including exposure of food to food-borne pathogens, pesticides, and much more.


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Eat, Drink, and Be Mindful: How to End Your Struggle with Mindless Eating and Start Savoring Food with Intention and Joy - Albers, Susan
Call Number: TX 357 .A393 2008
ISBN: 1572246154
Publication Date: 2009
Eat, Drink, and Be Mindful is a new tool for dealing with the age-old problem of mindless overeating. The author currently uses this workbook with clients in her Mindful Eating Support Groups. The book is a collection of more than seventy worksheets she has created. The workbook is organized around the seven skills of mindful-eater-awareness: observing, being in-the-moment, acceptance, letting go, non-judgment, and mindfulness of the environment. Each worksheet is one to two pages. This concise, easy-to-use guide is great for introducing people to mindful eating. More advanced mindful eaters love the journal format. It is also a helpful tool for therapists to use with their clients. Fans of Eating Mindfully, yo-yo dieters, dietitians, therapists, and doctors would be primary and secondary markets for this book. The workbook combines the ancient wisdom of mindfulness meditation techniques with cognitive behavior skills and cutting edge approaches to implementing and sustaining lasting change. In her first book, Albers, a psychologist and mindful eating expert, reveals how overeating or chaotic eating can be improved with mindful eating techniques.

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The End of Food - Roberts, Paul
Call Number: HD 9000.5 .R578 2008
ISBN: 0618606238
Publication Date: 2008
Paul Roberts, the best-selling author of The End of Oil, turns his attention to the modern food economy and finds that the system entrusted to meet our most basic need is failing. In this carefully researched, vivid narrative, Roberts lays out the stark economic realities behind modern food and shows how our system of making, marketing, and moving what we eat is growing less and less compatible with the billions of consumers that system was built to serve. At the heart of The End of Food is a grim paradox: the rise of large-scale food production, though it generates more food more cheaply than at any time in history, has reached a point of dangerously diminishing returns. Our high-volume factory systems are creating new risks for food-borne illness, from E. coli to avian flu. Our high-yield crops and livestock generate grain, vegetables, and meat of declining nutritional quality. While nearly one billion people worldwide are overweight or obese, the same number of people#151;one in every seven of us#151;can’t get enough to eat. In some of the hardest-hit regions, such as sub-Saharan Africa, the lack of a single nutrient, vitamin A, has left more than five million children permanently blind. Meanwhile, the shift to heavily mechanized, chemically intensive farming has so compromised soil and water that it’s unclear how long such output can be maintained. And just as we’ve begun to understand the limits of our abundance, the burgeoning economies of Asia, with their rising middle classes, are adopting Western-style, meat-heavy diets, putting new demands on global food supplies. Comprehensive in scope and full of fresh insights, The End of Food presents a lucid, stark vision of the future. It is a call for us to make crucial decisions to help us survive the demise of food production as we know it. Paul Roberts is the author of The End of Oil, which was a finalist for the New York Public Library's Helen Bernstein Book Award in 2005. He has written about resource economics and politics for numerous publications, including the Los Angeles Times, the Washington Post, Harper’s Magazine, and Rolling Stone, and lectures frequently on business and environmental issues.

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Exposed: The Toxic Chemistry of Everyday Products and What's at Stake for American Power - Schapiro, Mark
Call Number: HC 110 .E5 S386 2007
ISBN: 1933392150
Publication Date: 2007
New evidence seems to arrive daily—from stories about tainted pet food to toxic toys— of the dangerous consequences that lax environmental policies are having on the consumer products that we, and our children, use daily thanks to lobbying efforts by the U.S. chemical industry. Meanwhile, the European Union is forcing these global corporate giants to chart a new path that, by requiring safe products, is revamping how businesses can create safe products and make money. InExposed: The Toxic Chemistry of Everyday Products and What's at Stake for American Powerinvestigative journalist Mark Schapiro takes the reader inside the corridors of global power where tectonic battles are occurring that will impact the health of ourselves and the planet. Schapiro’s exposé shows how laws adopted by the European Union—where stricter consumer-safety standards have forced multinationals into manufacturing safer products. And, short of such strong government action the United States will lose its claim of economic and environmental supremacy. Increasingly, products developed and sold in the United States are equated with serious health hazards, and many of those products are soon to be banned from Europe and other parts of the world. Schapiro’s revelations in this though-provoking work will change the way American consumers think about everyday products—from plastic softeners that can contribute to sexual malformations to lipstick additives that are potential toxins to the brain, liver, kidneys, and immune system. And, it will stir them into forcing our government to take the lead of others, including the European Union, China, and countries in Central and South America. Exposedis a revealing and fascinating look at global markets, everyday products, and the toxic chemicals that bind them. It will shock, inform and warn American businesses and government leaders about the risks of being left behind in the international marketplace. Schapiro’s book also shines a light on Europe’s evolving search for higher standards that places Brussels, not Washington, at the center of global market innovation.

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Fair Bananas! Farmers, Workers, and Consumers Strive to Change an Industry - Frundt, Henry J.
Call Number: HD 9259 .B2 F78 2009
ISBN: 0816527202
Publication Date: 2009
Bananas are the most-consumed fruit in the world. In the United States alone, the public eats about twenty-eight pounds of bananas per person every year. The total value of the international banana trade is nearly five billion dollars annually, with 80 percent of all exported bananas originating in Latin America. There are as many as ten million people involved in growing, packing, and shipping bananas, but American consumers have only recently begun to think about them and about their working conditions. Although European nations have helped create a "fair trade" system for bananas grown in Mediterranean and Caribbean regions, the United States as a country has not developed a similar system for bananas grown in Latin America, where large corporations have dominated trade for more than a century. Fair Bananas! is one of the first books to examine the issue of "fair-trade bananas." Specifically, Henry Frundt analyzes whether a farmer-worker-consumer alliance can collaborate to promote a fair-trade label for bananas-much like those for fair-trade coffee and chocolate-that will appeal to North American shoppers. Researching the issue for more than ten years, Henry Frundt has elicited surprising and nuanced insights from banana workers, Latin American labor officials, company representatives, and fair-trade advocates. Frundt writes with admirable clarity throughout the book, which he has designed for college students who are being introduced to the subject of international trade and for consumers who are interested in issues of development. Frankly, though, Fair Bananas! will appeal to anyone who wants to know more about bananas, including where they come from and how they get from there to here.

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Farmers of the Golden Bean: Costa Rican Households, Global Coffee and Fair Trade - Sick, Deborah
Call Number: HD 8039 .C6382 C87 2008
ISBN: 0875806171
Publication Date: 2007
Sick explores contemporary issues of gender, empowerment, access to resources, and Fair Trade as she examines how Costa Rican coffee-producing households cope with the complexities of a globalizing world economy. Using a commodity approach, she integrates household, regional, and global processes. Farmers of the Golden Bean challenges previous assumptions about the nature of economic change and the sustainability of household producers in the global economy.

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Food and the City - Cockrall-King, Jennifer
Call Number: S 494.5 .U72 C63 2011
ISBN: 1616144580
Publication Date: 2012
A global movement to take back our food is growing. The future of farming is in our hands—and in our cities. When you’re standing in the midst of a supermarket, it’s hard to imagine that you’re looking at a failing industrial food system. The abundance all around you looks impressive but is really a façade. In fact, there’s just a three-day supply of food available for any given city due to complex, just-in-time international supply chains. The system is not only vulnerable, given the reality of food scares, international crises, terrorist attacks, economic upheavals, and natural disasters, but it is also environmentally unsustainable for the long term. As the cold hard facts of peak oil and peak water begin to have an impact, how will we feed a world population of seven billion and growing, most of whom are now urban dwellers? One answer is urban agriculture. This book examines alternative food systems in cities around the globe that are shortening their food chains, growing food within their city limits, and taking their "food security" into their own hands. This award-winning food journalist sought out leaders in the urban-agriculture movement and visited cities successfully dealing with "food deserts." What she found was not just a niche concern of activists but a global movement that cuts across the private and public spheres, economic classes, and cultures. She describes a global movement happening from London and Paris to Vancouver and New York to establish alternatives to the monolithic globally integrated supermarket model. A cadre of forward-looking, innovative people has created growing spaces in cities: on rooftops, backyards, vacant lots, along roadways, and even in "vertical farms." Whether it’s a community public orchard supplying the needs of local residents or an urban farm that has reclaimed a derelict inner city lot to grow and sell premium market veggies to restaurant chefs, the urban food revolution is clearly underway and working. This book is an exciting, fascinating chronicle of a game-changing movement, a rebellion against the industrial food behemoth, and a reclaiming of communities to grow, distribute, and eat locally.

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Food Chains: From Farmyard to Shopping Cart - Warren Belasco; Roger Horowitz; eds.
Call Number: HD 9000.5 .F5938 2009
ISBN: 0812221346
Publication Date: 2010
In recent years, the integrity of food production and distribution has become an issue of wide social concern. The media frequently report on cases of food contamination as well as on the risks of hormones and cloning. Journalists, documentary filmmakers, and activists have had their say, but until now a survey of the latest research on the history of the modern food-provisioning system--the network that connects farms and fields to supermarkets and the dining table--has been unavailable. In Food Chains, Warren Belasco and Roger Horowitz present a collection of fascinating case studies that reveal the historical underpinnings and institutional arrangements that compose this system. The dozen essays in Food Chains range widely in subject, from the pig, poultry, and seafood industries to the origins of the shopping cart. The book examines what it took to put ice in nineteenth-century refrigerators, why Soviet citizens could buy ice cream whenever they wanted, what made Mexican food popular in France, and why Americans turned to commercial pet food in place of table scraps for their dogs and cats. Food Chains goes behind the grocery shelves, explaining why Americans in the early twentieth century preferred to buy bread rather than make it and how Southerners learned to like self-serve shopping. Taken together, these essays demonstrate the value of a historical perspective on the modern food-provisioning system.

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Food, Inc.: How Industrial Food Is Making Us Sicker, Gatter and Poorer - And What You Can Do About It - Weber, Karl, ed.
Call Number: HD 9005 .F6582 2009
ISBN: 1586486942
Publication Date: 2009
Food, Inc. is guaranteed to shake up our perceptions of what we eat. This powerful documentary deconstructing the corporate food industry in America was hailed by Entertainment Weekly as #147;more than a terrific movie#151;it’s an important movie.” Aided by expert commentators such as Michael Pollan and Eric Schlosser, the film poses questions such as: Where has my food come from, and who has processed it? What are the giant agribusinesses and what stake do they have in maintaining the status quo of food production and consumption? How can I feed my family healthy foods affordably? Expanding on the film’s themes, the book Food, Inc. will answer those questions through a series of challenging essays by leading experts and thinkers. This book will encourage those inspired by the film to learn more about the issues, and act to change the world.

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Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health - Nestle, Marion
Call Number: TX 360 .U6 N47 2002
ISBN: 0520224655
Publication Date: 2002
We all witness, in advertising and on supermarket shelves, the fierce competition for our food dollars. In this engrossing exposé, Marion Nestle goes behind the scenes to reveal how the competition really works and how it affects our health. The abundance of food in the United States--enough calories to meet the needs of every man, woman, and child twice over--has a downside. Our overefficient food industry must do everything possible to persuade people to eatmore--more food, more often, and in larger portions--no matter what it does to waistlines or well-being. Like manufacturing cigarettes or building weapons, making food is very big business. Food companies in 2000 generated nearly $900 billion in sales. They have stakeholders to please, shareholders to satisfy, and government regulations to deal with. It is nevertheless shocking to learn precisely how food companies lobby officials, co-opt experts, and expand sales by marketing to children, members of minority groups, and people in developing countries. We learn that the food industry plays politics as well as or better than other industries, not least because so much of its activity takes place outside the public view. Editor of the 1988Surgeon General's Report on Nutrition and Health,Nestle is uniquely qualified to lead us through the maze of food industry interests and influences. She vividly illustrates food politics in action: watered-down government dietary advice, schools pushing soft drinks, diet supplements promoted as if they were First Amendment rights. When it comes to the mass production and consumption of food, strategic decisions are driven by economics--not science, not common sense, and certainly not health. No wonder most of us are thoroughly confused about what to eat to stay healthy. An accessible and balanced account,Food Politicswill forever change the way we respond to food industry marketing practices. By explaining how much the food industry influences government nutrition policies and how cleverly it links its interests to those of nutrition experts, this pathbreaking book helps us understand more clearly than ever before what we eat and why.

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French Beans and Food Scares: Culture and Commerce in an Anxious Age - Freidberg, Susanne
Call Number: HD 9011.7 .E5 F74 2004
ISBN: 0195169611
Publication Date: 2004
From mad cows to McDonaldization to genetically modified maize, European food scares and controversies at the turn of the millennium provoked anxieties about the perils hidden in an increasingly industrialized, internationalized food supply. These food fears have cast a shadow as long as Africa, where farmers struggle to meet European demand for the certifiably clean green bean. But the trade in fresh foods between Africa and Europe is hardly uniform. Britain and France still do businessmostly with their former colonies, in ways that differ as dramatically as their national cuisines. The British buy their "baby veg" from industrial-scale farms, pre-packaged and pre-trimmed; the French, meanwhile, prefer their green beans naked, and produced by peasants. Managers and technologists coordinate the baby veg trade between Anglophone Africa and Britain, whereas an assortment of commercants and self-styled agro-entrepreneurs run the French bean trade. Globalization, then, has not erased cultural difference in the world of food and trade, but instead has stretched it to a transnational scale. French Beans and Food Scares explores the cultural economies of two "non-traditional" commodity trades between Africa and Europe--one anglophone, the other francophone--in order to show not only why they differ but also how both have felt the fall-out of the wealthy world's food scares. In a voyage that begins in the mid-19th century and ends in the early 21st, passing by way of Paris, London, Burkina Faso and Zambia, French Beans and Food Scares illuminates the daily work of exporters, importers and other invisible intermediaries in the global fresh food economy. These intermediaries' accounts provide a unique perspective on the practical and ethical challenges of globalized food trading in an anxious age. They also show how postcolonial ties shape not only different societies' geographies of food supply, but also their very ideas about what makes food good.

The Great White Fleet - Melville, John H.
Call Number: HD 9249 .U6 M48 1976
ISBN: 0533021766
Publication Date: 1976

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The Meat You Eat: How Corporate Farming Has Endangered America's Food Supply - Midkiff, Kenneth
Call Number: HD 9415 .M53 2004
ISBN: 0312325355
Publication Date: 2004
"We have given up to the agribusiness corporations a crucial part of our responsibility as human beings and we must now think of ways to take it back." - Wendell Berry, from the Foreword In this eye-opening book, Sierra Club Director Ken Midkiff exposes the dangers posed by corporate control of agriculture (agribusiness)--to our health, and to the health of the nation's economy, security, and the environment. The Meat You Eat explores the current practices of the corporations taking over the raising and slaughtering of farm animals (and farmed fish, such as salmon). These companies use a model that has transformed livestock farming from quality-driven family-owned operations into big businesses concerned with volume, efficiency, uniformity, and profits above all. Midkiff reveals the true cost of agribusiness on all levels-environmental, financial, moral, legal, and medical-balancing startling truths with practical solutions. Rather than advocate a vegan or vegetarian diet, Midkiff argues that using and supporting local farmers will improve the quality of life for us all, as well as for the animals whose meat we eat. Complete with resource sections about where to find local farmers and lists of agribusiness culprits, the book encourages us to take an active interest in what we put on our plates and in our mouths, and use the power of our pocketbooks to make it clear that our health, our environment, and our communities are of vital importance. With a foreword by Wendell Berry, hailed by The New York Times Books Review as the "great moral essayist of our day," The Meat You Eat is an informative and ringing call to arms.

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Mindless Eating: Why We Eat More than We Think - Wansink, Brian
Call Number: RC 552 .C65 W36 2007
ISBN: 0553384481
Publication Date: 2007
In this illuminating and groundbreaking new book, food psychologist Brian Wansink shows why you may not realize how much you’re eating, what you’re eating–or why you’re even eating at all. • Does food with a brand name really taste better? • Do you hate brussels sprouts because your mother did? • Does the size of your plate determine how hungry you feel? • How much would you eat if your soup bowl secretly refilled itself? • What does your favorite comfort food really say about you? • Why do you overeat so much at healthy restaurants? Brian Wansink is a Stanford Ph.D. and the director of the Cornell University Food and Brand Lab. He’s spent a lifetime studying what we don’t notice: the hidden cues that determine how much and why people eat. Using ingenious, fun, and sometimes downright fiendishly clever experiments like the “bottomless soup bowl,” Wansink takes us on a fascinating tour of the secret dynamics behind our dietary habits. How does packaging influence how much we eat? Which movies make us eat faster? How does music or the color of the room influence how much we eat? How can we recognize the “hidden persuaders” used by restaurants and supermarkets to get us to mindlessly eat? What are the real reasons most diets are doomed to fail? And how can we use the “mindless margin” to lose–instead of gain–ten to twenty pounds in the coming year? Mindless Eating will change the way you look at food, and it will give you the facts you need to easily make smarter, healthier, more mindful and enjoyable choices at the dinner table, in the supermarket, in restaurants, at the office–even at a vending machine–wherever you decide to satisfy your appetite. From the Hardcover edition.

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Multinational Agribusinesses - Rama, Ruth
Call Number: HD 2755.5 .M817 2005
ISBN: 1560229373
Publication Date: 2004
Stay a step ahead of the global competition in food and fiber production, processing, and sales! Multinational Agribusinesses is an essential guide to the inner workings of companies with direct investments in the food and fiber system in the United States and the world. The book provides in-depth and up-to-date analysis of the crucial issues facing multinational enterprises involved in input and output supply activities, commodity investment, food manufacturing, and food distribution. An international panel of academics and researchers working in economics and agriculture presents strategic management and economic analysis of agribusinesses representing a variety of sizes and nationalities. Multinational Agribusinesses examines the key areas of concern to multinationals involved with food and drink processing and/or upstream industries, including recent trends, growth factors, innovations, product and geographic diversification, and intra-firm trade. The book presents updated statistics (total sales, agrifood sales, net income, employment figures, number of total businesses on overseas and home markets) on the world's 100 largest food multinationals, and updated tables on sell-offs, divestitures, and plant closures. Multinational Agribusinesses looks at enterprises in the United States, Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Southeast Asia, and Brazil, including Ajinomoto®, Coca-Cola®, Nestlé®, Ralston Purina®, Unilever®, Barilla®, and the Charoen Pokphan Group®. Multinational Agribusinesses provides managers with answers to the questions they consider every day, including: Why do some multinational agribusinesses grow faster than others? Is product or geographic diversification conducive to good performance? Are Japanese food multinationals a challenge to my business? What industrial and geographical strategies are my competitors using? Government officials in countries hosting multinationals can find answers to their questions, including: Is my food multinational taking its research and development facilities abroad? Will foreign direct investment outflows reduce my country's export of food? Are multinational agribusinesses from new source countries viable? And Multinational Agribusinesses will supply academics with responses to theoretical inquiries, such as: Is the standard theory of the multinational enterprises applicable to food multinationals? What are the specificities of food multinationals compared to other multinationals? Multinational Agribusinesses is a unique resource for international business managers, officials from government or international organizations, and academics working in international business studies and agricultural economics.

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The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals - Pollan, Michael
Call Number: GT 2850 .P65 2006
ISBN: 1594200823
Publication Date: 2006
Make this your next book club selection and everyone saves. Get 15% off when you order 5 or more of this title for your book club. Simply enter the coupon code POLLANOMNIVORE at checkout. This offer does not apply to eBook purchases. This offer applies to only one downloadable audio per purchase. What should we have for dinner?" To one degree or another this simple question assails any creature faced with a wide choice of things to eat. Anthropologists call it the omnivore's dilemma. Choosing from among the countless potential foods nature offers, humans have had to learn what is safe, and what isn't—which mushrooms should be avoided, for example, and which berries we can enjoy. Today, as America confronts what can only be described as a national eating disorder, the omnivore's dilemma has returned with an atavistic vengeance. The cornucopia of the modern American supermarket and fast-food outlet has thrown us back on a bewildering landscape where we once again have to worry about which of those tasty-looking morsels might kill us. At the same time we're realizing that our food choices also have profound implications for the health of our environment. The Omnivore's Dilemma is bestselling author Michael Pollan's brilliant and eye-opening exploration of these little-known but vitally important dimensions of eating in America. Pollan has divided The Omnivore's Dilemma into three parts, one for each of the food chains that sustain us: industrialized food, alternative or "organic" food, and food people obtain by dint of their own hunting, gathering, or gardening. Pollan follows each food chain literally from the ground up to the table, emphasizing our dynamic coevolutionary relationship with the species we depend on. He concludes each section by sitting down to a meal—at McDonald's, at home with his family sharing a dinner from Whole Foods, and in a revolutionary "beyond organic" farm in Virginia. For each meal he traces the provenance of everything consumed, revealing the hidden components we unwittingly ingest and explaining how our taste for particular foods reflects our environmental and biological inheritance. We are indeed what we eat-and what we eat remakes the world. A society of voracious and increasingly confused omnivores, we are just beginning to recognize the profound consequences of the simplest everyday food choices, both for ourselves and for the natural world. The Omnivore's Dilemma is a long-overdue book and one that will become known for bringing a completely fresh perspective to a question as ordinary and yet momentous as What shall we have for dinner? A few facts and figures from The Omnivore's Dilemma: Of the 38 ingredients it takes to make a McNugget, there are at least 13 that are derived from corn. 45 different menu items at Mcdonald’s are made from corn. One in every three American children eats fast food every day. One in every five American meals today is eaten in the car. The food industry burns nearly a fifth of all the petroleum consumed in the United States—more than we burn with our cars and more than any other industry consumes. It takes ten calories of fossil fuel energy to deliver one calorie of food energy to an American plate. A single strawberry contains about five calories. To get that strawberry from a field in California to a plate on the east coast requires 435 calories of energy. Industrial fertilizer and industrial pesticides both owe their existence to the conversion of the World War II munitions industry to civilian uses—nerve gases became pesticides, and ammonium nitrate explosives became nitrogen fertilizers. ... .

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Poisons on Our Plates: The Real Food Safety Problem in the United States - Morrone, Michele
Call Number: RA 1258 .M66 2008
ISBN: 0313349754
Publication Date: 2008
The safety of our food supply is an environmental health issue that affects every American citizen. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that more than 76 million people in the United States suffer from foodborne illnesses every year. Microbiological contamination--bacteria, viruses, and parasites--is the leading cause of foodborne illness. Morrone faults the media for focusing the anxieties of the American public on such issues as irradiated food, genetically modified foods, and mad cow disease, while ignoring the microbial foodborne pathogens that are running amok in our food supply--except when point-source outbreaks of E. coli in spinach and green onions or salmonella in peanut butter sicken thousands of people at once. Many readers will be alarmed to learn from "Poisons on Our Plates" that there is no federal environmental health policy or agency that controls the bacteria and viruses in our food supply. The FDA Food Code and various voluntary systems overseen by local health departments are woefully inadequate. Drawing on disturbing stories told by food safety professionals as well as on statistical studies, the author paints a grimly fascinating picture of the impact of bacteria and viruses on our food supply and how they can make us sick. Morrone examines the increased risks that come with the rise in food imports from high-contamination countries such as China and Mexico. She advocates major changes to our nation's environmental health policies in order to control the growing dangers that foodborne illness pose to public health.

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The Real Cost of Cheap Food - Carolan, Michael
Call Number: HD 9000.5 .C258 2011
ISBN: 1849713200
Publication Date: 2011
This challenging but accessible book critically examines the dominant food regime on its own terms, by seriously asking whether we can afford cheap food and exploring what exactly cheap food affords us. Detailing the numerous ways that food has become reduced to a state, such as a price per ounce, combination of nutrients, yield per acre, or calories, the book argues for a more contextual understanding of food when debating its affordability. The author makes a compelling case for why today's global food system produces just the opposite of what it promises. The food produced under this regime is in fact exceedingly expensive. Thus meat production and consumption are inefficient uses of resources and contribute to climate change; the use of pesticides in industrial-scale agriculture may produce cheap food, but there are hidden costs to environmental protection, human health and biodiversity conservation. Many of these costs will be paid for by future generationsnbsp;- cheap food today may mean expensive food tomorrow. By systematically assessing these costs the book delves into issues related, but not limited, to international development, national security, health care, industrial meat production, organic farming, corporate responsibility, government subsidies, food aid and global commodity markets. The book concludes by suggesting ways forward, going beyond the usual solutions such as farmers markets, community supported agriculture, and community gardens. Exploding the myth of cheap food requires we have at our disposal a host of practices and policies. Some of those proposed and explored include microloans, subsidies for consumers, vertical agriculture, and the democratization of subsidies for producers.

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The Reluctant Farmer: An Exploration of Work, Social Class, and the Production of Food - Dougherty, Debbie S.
ISBN: 1848763840
Publication Date: 2011
There are few social issues more pressing than the seemingly disparate issues of social class and safe food. At this point in history, food production, work, and social class are intertwined in a way that puts our collective health at risk, and discourse about food production has become 'classed language', designed to show one's place in the social stratosphere. Consequently, this shift in the function of discourse about food production has focused attention away from the three major issues facing the farming industry. First, farmers need to concern themselves with feeding the world's hungry populations. Second, farmers need to produce healthy food. Third, farmers need to be able to feed their own families.To illustrate the relationship between social class, work, and food production the author uses her own experience as an academic and a farmer, as well as interviews with a family farmer, an organic farmer, and a family who are agribusiness farmers. The author concludes that farming needs to be more diverse in order to feed hungry people around the world, and produce high quality, healthy food for the regional population where the food is produced. Several suggestions are provided that can be used to help farmers achieve this.The writer's gentle sense of humour and story telling approach make the book accessible to a wide range of readers. First, it would be a useful book for advanced undergraduates studying social justice, social class, or organizational communication. Second, the book will provide the material for the high level of conversation necessary in a graduate level course. Third, the book will be valuable to intelligent people concerned about both social justice and healthy food production.

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The Silk Road: Two Thousand Years in the Heart of Asia - Wood, Frances
Call Number: DS 33.1 .W59 2002
ISBN: 0520237862
Publication Date: 2003
The Silk Road, a series of ancient trade routes stretching across Central Asia to Europe, evokes exotic images of camel trains laden with bales of fine Chinese silk, spices, and perfume, of desert oases surrounded by snow-capped mountains, of bustling markets thronging with travellers buying and selling grapes, coriander, Baltic amber, and Mediterranean coral. Along this route, silks were sent from China to ancient Rome; princesses were dispatched in marriage alliances across the deserts; bandits and thieves launched attacks throughout history. Covering more than 5,000 years, this book, lavishly illustrated with photographs, manuscripts, and paintings from the collections of the British Library and other museums worldwide, presents an overall picture of the history and cultures of the Silk Road. It also contains many previously unpublished photographs by the great explorers Stein, Hedin, and Mannerheim. More than just a trade route, the Silk Road witnessed the movement of cultural influences. Frances Wood traces the story of the civilizations and ideas that flourished and moved along its vast geographical expanse. Indian Buddhism was carried into China on the Silk Road, initiating a long history of pilgrimages along the lonely desert routes; Manichaeism, Nestorian Christianity, and Islam also made their way eastwards along its route. The nineteenth century saw a new interest in Central Asia and the Silk Road, as Russia and Britain vied for power on the frontiers of Afghanistan. A new breed of explorer, part archaeologist, part cartographer, part spy, was seen on the Silk Road, while some of the ancient cities, long buried in sand-blown dunes, began to give up their secrets. This book brings the history of the Silk Road alive--from its beginnings to the present day, revealing a rich history still in the making.

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Slaughterhouse Blues: The Meat and Poultry Industry in North America - Donald D. Stull; Michael Broadway; Michael J. Broadway
Call Number: HD 9415 .S78 2004
ISBN: 0534613039
Publication Date: 2003
SLAUGHTERHOUSE BLUES: THE MEAT AND POULTRY INDUSTRY IN NORTH AMERICA draws on more than 15 years of research by the authors, a cultural anthropologist and a social geographer, to present a detailed look at the meat and poultry industry in the United States and Canada. Following chapters on today's beef, poultry, and pork industries, SLAUGHTERHOUSE BLUES examines industry impacts on workers and on the communities that host its plants. The book details the authors' efforts to help communities plan for and mitigate the negative consequences of meat and poultry plants as well as community opposition to confined animal feeding operations. The book concludes by exploring alternatives to North America's model of industrialized meat production.

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Spice: The History of Temptation - Turner, Jack
Call Number: TX 406 .T87 2005
ISBN: 0375707050
Publication Date: 2005
A brilliant, original history of the spice trade—and the appetites that fueled it. It was in search of the fabled Spice Islands and their cloves that Magellan charted the first circumnavigation of the globe. Vasco da Gama sailed the dangerous waters around Africa to India on a quest for Christians—and spices. Columbus sought gold and pepper but found the New World. By the time these fifteenth- and sixteenth-century explorers set sail, the aromas of these savory, seductive seeds and powders had tempted the palates and imaginations of Europe for centuries. Spice: The History of a Temptation is a history of the spice trade told not in the conventional narrative of politics and economics, nor of conquest and colonization, but through the intimate human impulses that inspired and drove it. Here is an exploration of the centuries-old desire for spice in food, in medicine, in magic, in religion, and in sex—and of the allure of forbidden fruit lingering in the scents of cinnamon, pepper, ginger, nutmeg, mace, and clove. We follow spices back through time, through history, myth, archaeology, and literature. We see spices in all their diversity, lauded as love potions and aphrodisiacs, as panaceas and defenses against the plague. We journey from religious rituals in which spices were employed to dispel demons and summon gods to prodigies of gluttony both fantastical and real. We see spices as a luxury for a medieval king’s ostentation, as a mummy’s deodorant, as the last word in haute cuisine. Through examining the temptations of spice we follow in the trails of the spice seekers leading from the deserts of ancient Syria to thrill-seekers on the Internet. We discover how spice became one of the first and most enduring links between Asia and Europe. We see in the pepper we use so casually the relic of a tradition linking us to the appetites of Rome, Elizabethan England, and the pharaohs. And we capture the pleasure of spice not only at the table but in every part of life. Spice is a delight to be savored. From the Hardcover edition.

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Squeezed: What You Don't Know About Orange Juice - Hamilton, Alissa
Call Number: HD 9348.5 .O723 H35 2009
ISBN: 0300124716
Publication Date: 2009
Close to three quarters of U.S. households buy orange juice. Its popularity crosses class, cultural, racial, and regional divides. Why do so many of us drink orange juice? How did it turn from a luxury into a staple in just a few years? More important, how is it that we don’t know the real reasons behind OJ’s popularity or understand the processes by which the juice is produced? In this enlightening book, Alissa Hamilton explores the hidden history of orange juice. She looks at the early forces that propelled orange juice to prominence, including a surplus of oranges that plagued Florida during most of the twentieth century and the army’s need to provide vitamin C to troops overseas during World War II. She tells the stories of the FDA’s decision in the early 1960s to standardize orange juice, and the juice equivalent of the cola wars that followed between Coca-Cola (which owns Minute Maid) and Pepsi (which owns Tropicana). Of particular interest to OJ drinkers will be the revelation that most orange juice comes from Brazil, not Florida, and that even “not from concentrate” orange juice is heated, stripped of flavor, stored for up to a year, and then reflavored before it is packaged and sold. The book concludes with a thought-provoking discussion of why consumers have the right to know how their food is produced.

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Stolen Fruit: The Tropical Commodities Disaster - Robbins, Peter
Call Number: HF 1040.9 .D44 R62 2003
ISBN: 1842772813
Publication Date: 2003
This investigation by one of the leading authorities on commodity trading examines the failed commodity market in developing countries and current trading arrangements. Peter Robbins looks into the possible solutions being proffered--from ideas to exploit new niche markets and improve quality--to more radical notions like fair trade, and shows how they all fail to measure up to the scale of the disaster facing the Third World. Instead, he argues developing countries must take a leaf out of supply side economics, and themselves take the measures required to bring supply and demand into a better balance that will secure them far higher and more stable prices than today.

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Strawberries in Winter: On Global Trends and Global Governance - Nowotny, Thomas
Call Number: HC 21 .M76 2004
ISBN: 3631515278
Publication Date: 2004
Over the last fifty years the world's population has doubled. Global wealth has tripled. These changes altered the nature of the global system. The book tries to track this impact on the environment, on the energy consumption, on the equality or inequality of income within and between states, on the use of war and of other organised forms of violence, etc. Have these developments brought progress, and if so, how could one measure it? Due to the growing density of world-wide linkages, the global system has become very complex. It needs governance so as to be stable and to remain evolving. International governmental and non-governmental organisations, trans-national enterprises, the US acting as global hegemon - all have a role in governance, as do states which remain the most important global actors. However, global governance is insufficient still. The scope for social/political choice has widened. Yet we do not have the tools to rule out those options that would have truly disastrous consequences.

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The Social Life of Coffee: The Emergence of the British Coffeehouse - Cowan, Brian
ISBN: 0300171226
Publication Date: 2011
What induced the British to adopt foreign coffee-drinking customs in the seventeenth century? Why did an entirely new social institution, the coffeehouse, emerge as the primary place for consumption of this new drink? In this lively book, Brian Cowan locates the answers to these questions in the particularly British combination of curiosity, commerce, and civil society. Cowan provides the definitive account of the origins of coffee drinking and coffeehouse society, and in so doing he reshapes our understanding of the commercial and consumer revolutions in Britain during the long Stuart century. Britain's virtuosi, gentlemanly patrons of the arts and sciences, were profoundly interested in things strange and exotic. Cowan explores how such virtuosi spurred initial consumer interest in coffee and invented the social template for the first coffeehouses. As the coffeehouse evolved, rising to take a central role in British commercial and civil society, the virtuosi were also transformed by their own invention.
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Sweetness and Power: The Place of Sugar in Modern History - Mintz, Sidney W.
Call Number: GT 2869 .M56 1985
ISBN: 0670687022
Publication Date: 1985

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Tangled Routes: Women, Work, and Globalization on the Tomato Trail - Barndt, Deborah
Call Number: HD 6073 .F72 M493 2008
ISBN: 0742555577
Publication Date: 2007
Where does our food come from? Whose hands have planted, cultivated, picked, packed, processed, transported, scanned, sold, sliced, and cooked it? What production practices have transformed it from seed to fruit, from fresh to processed form? Who decides what is grown and how? What are the effects of those decisions on our health and the health of the planet? Tangled Routes tackles these fascinating questions and demystifies globalization by tracing the long journey of a corporate tomato from a Mexican field to a Canadian fast-food restaurant. Through an interdisciplinary lens, Deborah Barndt examines the dynamic relationships between production and consumption, work and technology, biodiversity and cultural diversity, and health and environment. A globalization-from-above perspective is reflected in the corporate agendas of a Mexican agribusiness, the U.S.-based McDonald's chain, and Canadian-based Loblaws supermarkets. The women workers on the front line of these businesses offer a humanized globalization-from-below perspective, while yet another "globalization" is revealed through examples of resistance and local alternatives. This revised and updated edition highlights developments since the turn of the millennium, in particular the deepening economic integration of the NAFTA countries as well as the growing questioning of NAFTA's consequences and the crafting of alternatives built on foundations of sustainability and justice.

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Tea: A Global History - Saberi, Helen
ISBN: 9781861898920
Publication Date: 2010
From chai to oolong to sencha, tea is one of the world's most popular beverages. Perhaps that is because it is a unique and adaptable drink, consumed in many different varieties by cultures across the globe and in many different settings, from the intricate traditions of Japanese teahouses to the elegant tearooms of Britain to the verandas of the deep South. In Tea food historian Helen Saberi explores this rich and fascinating history. Saberi looks at the economic and social uses of tea, such as its use as a currency during the Tang Dynasty and 1913 creation of a tea dance called "Thé Dansant" that combined tea and tango. Saberi also explores where and how tea is grown around the world and how customs and traditions surrounding the beverage have evolved from its legendary origins to its present-day popularity. Featuring vivid images of teacups, plants, tearooms, and teahouses as well as recipes for both drinking tea and using it as a flavoring, Tea will engage the senses while providing a history of tea and its uses.

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Tea -- A Journey in Time: Pioneering and Trials in the Jungle - Weatherstone, John
Call Number: HD 9198 .A2 2008
ISBN: 1899163859
Publication Date: 2008
Tea--A Journey in Time explains how the industry has changed over the past three centuries right up to the present day. During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the quest for plants and seed of commercial importance led to the transportation of plants from one side of the world to the other. These plants and seeds were in every sense as valuable as gold and essential to the British Empire and its continuing development and prosperity. The final chapter in this fascinating book breaks new ground by examining the state of tea plantations as we enter the twenty-first century. To the keen tea drinkers, it graphically shows present-day living conditions for the workers, as well as how tea is grown and manufactured. Beautifully illustrated with fine color plates, drawings, engravings, and photographs, both past and present.

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Toxic Exports: The Transfer of Hazardous Wastes from Rich to Poor Countries - Clapp, Jennifer
Call Number: TD 1045 .D44 C58 2001
ISBN: 080143887X
Publication Date: 2001
In recent years, international trade in toxic waste and hazardous technologies by firms in rich industrialized countries has emerged as a routine practice. Many poor countries have accepted these deadly imports but are ill equipped to manage the materials safely. For more than a decade, environmentalists and the governments of developing countries have lobbied intensively and generated public outcry in an attempt to halt hazardous transfers from Northern industrialized nations to the Third World, but the practice continues. In her insightful and important book, Jennifer Clapp addresses this alarming problem. Clapp describes the responses of those engaged in hazard transfer to international regulations, and in particular to the 1989 adoption of the Basel Convention. She pinpoints a key weakness of the regulations--because hazard transfer is dynamic, efforts to stop one form of toxic export prompt new forms to emerge. For instance, laws intended to ban the disposal of toxic wastes in the Third World led corporations to ship these byproducts to poor countries for "recycling." And, Clapp warns, current efforts to prohibit this "recycling movement" may accelerate a new business endeavor: the relocation to poor countries of entire industries that generate toxic wastes. Clapp concludes that the dynamic nature of hazard transfer results from increasingly fluid global trade and investment relations in the context of a highly unequal world, and from the leading role played by multinational corporations and environmental NGOs. Governments, she maintains, have for too long failed to capture the initiative and have instead only reacted to these opposing forces.

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Twinkie, Deconstructed: My Journey to Discover How the Ingredients Found in Processed Foods Are Grown, Mined (Yes, Mined), and Manipulated into What America Eats - Ettlinger, Steve
Call Number: TX 553 .A3 E85 2008
ISBN: 0452289289
Publication Date: 2008
A pop-science journey into the surprising ingredients found in most common packaged foods Like most Americans, Steve Ettlinger eats processed foods. And, like most consumers, he didn't have a clue as to what most of the ingredients on the labels mean. So when his young daughter asked, Daddy, what's polysorbate 60?, he was at a loss and determined to find out. From the phosphate mines in Idaho to the oil fields in China to the Hostess factories and their practices, Twinkie, Deconstructed demystifies some of the most common processed food ingredients, where they come from, how they are made, how they are used, and why. Beginning at the source (hint: they're often more closely linked to rock and petroleum than any of the four food groups), we follow each Twinkie ingredient through the process of being crushed, baked, fermented, refined, and/or reacted into a totally unrecognizable goo or powder, all for the sake of creating a simple snack cake. An insightful exploration of the modern food industry, if you've ever wondered what you're eating when you consume foods containing mono- and diglycerides or calcium sulfate (the latter a food-grade equivalent of plaster of paris), this book is for you.  Consequently, as Hostess plans to permanently close its doors in 2012, this book will provide a relevant guide into the practices of one of the biggest companies of all time.  .

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Waste: Uncovering the Global Food Scandal - Stuart, Tristram
Call Number: TD 899 .F585 S78 2009
ISBN: 0393068366
Publication Date: 2009
With shortages, volatile prices and nearly one billion people hungry, the world has a food problem—or thinks it does. Farmers, manufacturers, supermarkets and consumers in North America and Europe discard up to half of their food—enough to feed all the world's hungry at least three times over. Forests are destroyed and nearly one tenth of the West's greenhouse gas emissions are released growing food that will never be eaten. While affluent nations throw away food through neglect, in the developing world crops rot because farmers lack the means to process, store and transport them to market. But there could be surprisingly painless remedies for what has become one of the world's most pressing environmental and social problems. Waste traces the problem around the globe from the top to the bottom of the food production chain. Stuart's journey takes him from the streets of New York to China, Pakistan and Japan and back to his home in England. Introducing us to foraging pigs, potato farmers and food industry CEOs, Stuart encounters grotesque examples of profligacy, but also inspiring innovations and ways of making the most of what we have. The journey is a personal one, as Stuart is a dedicated freegan, who has chosen to live off of discarded or self-produced food in order to highlight the global food waste scandal. Combining front-line investigation with startling new data, Waste shows how the way we live now has created a global food crisis—and what we can do to fix it.

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Wrestling with Starbucks: Conscience, Capital, Cappuccino - Fellner, Kim
ISBN: 0813543207
Publication Date: 2008
"Say "Starbucks" and people start talking. From Paris, France, to Paris, Texas, Tampa to Tokyo, perfect strangers will gladly debate the merits of Starbucks coffee and the meaning of Starbucks in modem life. In Wrestling with Starbucks, an investigation into Starbucks' ethos and actions, social justice activist Kim Fellner asks how a coffeehouse chain with a liberal reputation came to symbolize, for some, the ills of globalization Fellner takes readers on an expedition into the muscle and soul of the coffee company. She finds a corporation filled with contradictions: between employee-friendly processes and anti-union practices; between an internationalist vision and a longing for global dominance; between community individuality and cultural conformity."--BOOK JACKET.
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The World According to Monsanto: Pollution, Corruption, and the Control of Our Good Supply - Robin, Marie Monique
ISBN: 9781595585363
Publication Date: 2010
The result of a remarkable three-year-long investigation that took award-winning journalist and documentary filmmaker Marie-Monique Robin across four continents (North and South America, Europe, and Asia), The World According to Monsanto tells the little-known yet shocking story of this agribusiness giant#151;the world’s leading producer of GMOs (genetically modified organisms)#151;and how its new #147;green” face is no less malign than its PCB- and Agent Orange#150;soaked past. Robin reports that, following its long history of manufacturing hazardous chemicals and lethal herbicides, Monsanto is now marketing itself as a #147;life sciences” company, seemingly convinced about the virtues of sustainable development. However, Monsanto now controls the majority of the yield of the world’s genetically modified corn and soy#151;ingredients found in more than 95 percent of American households#151;and its alarming legal and political tactics to maintain this monopoly are the subject of worldwide concern. Released to great acclaim and controversy in France, throughout Europe, and in Latin America alongside the documentary film of the same name, The World According to Monsanto is sure to change the way we think about food safety and the corporate control of our food supply.

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Chocolate Wars: The 150-year Rivalry Between the World's Greatest Chocolate Makers - Cadbury, Deborah
ISBN: 9781586489250
Publication Date: 2010
With a cast of characters that wouldn’t be out of place in a Victorian novel, Chocolate Wars tells the story of the great chocolatier dynasties, through the prism of the Cadburys. Chocolate was consumed unrefined and unprocessed as a rather bitter, fatty drink for the wealthy elite until the late 19th century, when the Swiss discovered a way to blend it with milk and unleashed a product that would conquer every market in the world. Thereafter, one of the great global business rivalries unfolded as each chocolate maker attempted to dominate its domestic market and innovate new recipes for chocolate that would set it apart from its rivals. The contest was full of dramatic contradictions: The Cadburys were austere Quakers who found themselves making millions from an indulgent product; Kitty Hershey could hardly have been more flamboyant yet her husband was moved by the Cadburys tradition of philanthropy. Each was a product of their unique time and place yet they shared one thing: they want to make the best chocolate in the world.
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